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Herbert H. Clark (1235)

Interests
Cognitive psychology, experimental psychology, psycholinguistics.
Nationality
American
Born
1940, Deadwood, South Dakota, USA
Short Biography
Herbert Herb Clark (born 1940) is a psycholinguist currently serving as Professor of Psychology at Stanford University. His focuses include cognitive and social processes in language use; interactive processes in conversation, from low-level disfluencies ... Show more | More at Wikipedia
Education
  • BA Stanford University, 1962
  • MA Johns Hopkins University, 1964
  • PhD Johns Hopkins University, 1966
Appointments & Honors
  • NSF Graduate Fellowship, 1963-6
  • Assistant Professor, Carnegie-Mellon University, 1966-9
  • Associate Professor, Stanford University, 1969-75, Professor, Stanford University, 1975-
  • Guggenheim Fellowship, 1975-6
  • Fellow, APA Division 3, 1978-
  • Fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, 1978-9
  • Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1982-
  • Society of Experimental Psychologists, 1984-
Principal Publications
  • 1969 Linguistic processes in deductive reasoning. Psychological Review, 76, 387-404.
  • 1972 On the process of comparing sentences against pictures. Cognitive Psychology, 3, 472-517 (with W. G. Chase).
  • 1973 Space, time, semantics, and the child. In T. Moore (ed.), Cognitive Development and the Acquisition of Language. Academic Press, 27-63.
  • 1973 The language-as-fixed-effect fallacy: A critique of language statistics in psychological research. Journal of Verbal Leaming and Verbal Behavior, 12, 335-59.
  • 1977 Comprehension and the given-new contract. In R. O. Freedle (ed.), Discourse Production and Comprehension. Erlbaum (with S. E. Haviland).
  • 1979 Responding to indirect speech acts. Cognitive Psychology, 11, 430-77.
  • 1979 When nouns surface as verbs. Language, 55, 767-811 (with E. V. Clark).
  • 1981 Definite reference and mutual knowledge. In A. K. Joshi, B. Webber and I. Sag (eds), Linguistics Structure and Discourse Setting. Cambridge University Press (with C. Marshall).
  • 1982 Hearers and speech acts. Language, 58, 332-73 (with T. B. Carlson).
  • 1985 Language use and language users. In G. Lindzey and E. Aronson (eds), The Handbook of Social Psychology, 3rd edn. Harper & Row.
  • 1987 Collaborating on contributions to conversations. Language and Cognitive Processes, 2, 19-41 (with E. F. Schaefer).
  • 1989 Contributing to discourse. Cognitive Science, 13, 259-94.
  • 1990 Ostensible invitations. Language in Society, 19, 493-509.
  • 1990 Referring as a collaborative process. In P. R. Cohen, J. Morgan and M. E. Pollack (eds), Intentions in Communication. MIT Press (with D. Wilkes-Gibbs).
  • 1991 Grounding in communication. In L. B. Resnick, J. M. Levine and S. D. Teasley (eds), Perspectives on Socially Shared Cognition. APA (with S. E. Brennan).
  • 1991 Words, the world, and their possibilities. In G. R. Lockhead and J. R. Pomerantz (eds), The Perception of Structure: Essays in Honor of Wendell R. Garner. APA.
  • 1992 Arenas of Language Use. University of Chicago Press.
  • 1992 Asking questions and influencing answers. In J. M. Tanur (ed.), Questions about Questions: Inquiries into the Cognitive Bases of Surveys. Russell Sage Foundation (with M. F. Schober).
  • 1993 Reproduction and demonstration in quotation. Journal of Memory and Language, 32, 805-19 (with E. Wade).
  • 1994 Managing problems in speaking. Special issue: Spoken dialogue. Speech Communication, 15, 243-50.