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Walter Bradford Cannon (1319)

Interests
Physiology
Profession
Physiologist
Nationality
American
Born
1871, Prairie du Chein, Wisconsin, USA
Died
1945, Franklin, New Hampshire, USA
Short Biography
Walter Bradford Cannon (October 19, 1871 – October 1, 1945) was an American physiologist, professor and chairman of the Department of Physiology at Harvard Medical School. He coined the term fight or flight response, and he expanded on Claude Bernard's ... Show more | More at Wikipedia
Education
  • MA Harvard College, 1897
  • MD Harvard Medical School, 1900
Appointments & Honors
  • Professor of Physiology, Harvard Medical School, 1906-42
  • President of the American Physiological Society, 1914-16
Principal Publications
  • 1909 The influence of emotional states on the functions of the alimentary canal. American Journal of the Medical Sciences, 137, 480-7.
  • 1912 An explanation of hunger. American Journal ofPhysiology, 29, 363-6 (with A. L. Washburn).
  • 1914 The emergency function of the adrenal medulla in pain and other major emotions. American Journal of Physiology, 33, 356-72.
  • 1914 The intenelations of emotions as suggested by recent physiological researches. American Journal ofPsychology, 15, 256-82.
  • 1918 The physiological basis of thirst. Proceedings ofthe Royal Society of London, B90, 283-301.
  • 1919 Studies on the conditions of activity in endocrine glands: V. The isolated heart as an indicator of adrenal secretion induced by pain, asphyxia and excitement. American Journal of Physiology, 50, 399-432.
  • 1927 The James-Lange theory of emotions: A critical examination and an alternative. American Journal of Psychology, 39, 106-24.
  • 1929 Bodily Changes in Pain, Hunger, Fear and Rage. Branford.
  • 1932 The Wisdom of the Body. Norton (revised and enlarged 1960).
  • 1935 Stress and strains of homeostasis (Mary Scott Newbold lecture). American Journal of the Medical Sciences, 189, 1-14.
  • 1935 Autonomic Neuro-effector Systems. Macmillan (with A. Rosenbleuth).
  • 1942 'Voodoo' death. American Psychologist, 44, 169-81.