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Sandra Scarr (1164)

Interests
Child, youth and family services, developmental psychology, evaluation, measurement and statistics, Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues
Nationality
American
Born
1936, Washington, DC, USA
Short Biography
Sandra Wood Scarr (born August 1936) is an American psychology professor. The first female Full Professor in Psychology in the history of Yale University. She established core resources for the study of development, including the Minnesota Transracial ... Show more | More at Wikipedia
Education
  • AB 1958 Vassar College
  • AM 1963 Harvard University
  • PhD 1965 Harvard University
Appointments & Honors
  • Associate Professor, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania, 1970-1
  • Professor of Child Psychology, University of Minnesota, 1973-7
  • Professor of Psychology, Yale University, 1977-83
  • Commonwealth Professor of Psychology, University of Virginia, 1983-
  • Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy, APA, 1988
  • Founding Member, American Psychological Society, 1988
  • Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1989
  • James McKeen Cattell Award for Distinguished Contributions to Applied Research, American Psychological Society, 1993
  • President, American Psychological Society, 1996-7
  • Associate Editor, American Psychologist, 1976-80
  • Editor, Developmental Psychology, 1980-6
  • Co-Editor, Current Directions in Psychological Science, 1991-5
Principal Publications
  • 1968 Environmental bias in twin studies. Eugenics Quarterly, 15, 34-40.
  • 1971 Race, social class and IQ. Science, 174, 1285-95.
  • 1971 Heredity and behavior development. In Encyclopedia of Education. Macmillan.
  • 1973 The effects of early stimulation on low birth weight infants. Child Development, 44, 94-101.
  • 1974 Socialization. Merrill (with P. Salapatek).
  • 1976 IQ test performance of black children adopted by white families. American Psychologist, 31, 726-39 (with R. A. Weinberg).
  • 1976 Blood group, behavioral, and morphological differences among dizygotic twins. Social Biology, 22, 372-4.
  • 1980 Perceived and actual similarities in biological and adoptive families: Does perceived similarity bias genetic influence? Behavior Genetics, 10, 445-8 (with E. Scarf and R. A. Weinberg).
  • 1980 Heritability and educational policy: Genetic and environmental effects on IQ, aptitude, and achievement. Educational Psychologist, 15, 1-22 (with D. Yee).
  • 1981 Testing for children: Implications for assessment and intervention strategies. American Psychologist, 36: 1159-66.
  • 1982 Genetic differences in intelligence. In R. J. Sternberg (ed.), Handbook of Intelligence. Cambridge University Press (with L. Carter- Saltzman).
  • 1983 The Minnesota adoption studies: Genetic differences and malleability. Child Development, 54, 260-7 (with R. A. Weinberg).
  • 1983 How people make their own environments: A theory of genotype-environmental effects. Child Development, 54, 424-35 (with K. McCartney).
  • 1984 Mother Care/Other Care. Basic Books.
  • 1986 The early childhood enterprise: Care and education of the young. American Psychologist, 41, 1140-6 (with R. A. Weinberg).
  • 1987 Three cheers for behavior genetics. Behavior Genetics, 17, 219-28.
  • 1989 Working mothers and their families. American Psychologist, 44, 1402-9 (with D. Phillips and K. McCartney).
  • 1990 Facts, fantasies, and the future of child care in the United States. Psychological Science, 1, 26-35 (with D. Phillips and K. McCartney).
  • 1992 Developmental theories for the 1990s: Development and individual differences. Child Development, 63, 1-19.
  • 1993 IQ correlations in transracial adoptive families: An eleven year follow-up. Intelligence, 17, 541-55 (with R. A. Weinberg and l. D. Waldman).
  • 1993 Child care research: Issues, perspectives, and results. Annual Review of Psychology, 44, 613-44 (with N. Eisenberg).
  • 1993 Biological and cultural diversity: The legacy of Darwin for development. Child Development, 64, 1333-53.