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Harry Harlow (1523)

Interests
Clinical psychology, developmental psychology, experimental analysis of behaviour, physiological and comparative psychology
Profession
Psychologist
Nationality
American
Born
1905, Fairfield, Ohio, USA
Died
1981, Tucson, Arizona, USA
Short Biography
Harry Frederick Harlow (October 31, 1905 – December 6, 1981) was an American psychologist best known for his maternal-separation, dependency needs, and social isolation experiments on rhesus monkeys, which manifested the importance of care-giving and ... Show more | More at Wikipedia
Education
  • AB University of Stanford, 1927
  • PhD University of Stanford, 1930
Appointments & Honors
  • Professor, University of Wisconsin, 1930-74
  • Howard Crosby Warren Medal from the Society of Experimental Psychologists, 1956
  • President, APA, 1958
  • Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award, APA, 1960
  • National Medal of Science, 1967
  • G. Stanley Hall Award, 1972
  • Gold Medal, APA, 1973
  • International Kittay Scientific Medal Award, 1975
Principal Publications
  • 1932 Social facilitation of feeding in the albino rat. Pedagogical Seminary (later Journal of Genetic Psychology), 41, 211-21.
  • 1949 The formation of learning sets. Psychological Review, 56, 51-65.
  • 1950 Leaming motivated by a manipulation drive. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 40, 228-34 (with M. K. Harlow and D. R. Meyer).
  • 1953 Mice, monkeys, men and motives. Psychological Review, 60, 23-32.
  • 1958 The evolution of learning. In A. Roe and G. G. Simpson (eds), Behavior and Evolution. Yale University Press.
  • 1958 The nature of love. American Psychologist, 13, 673-85.
  • 1958 Biological and Biochemical Bases of Behavior. University of Wisconsin Press.
  • 1959 Affectional responses in the infant monkey. Science, 130, 421-32 (with R. R. Zimmerman).
  • 1959 Leaming set and error factor theory. In S. Koch (ed.), Psychology: A Study ofa Science, vol. 2. McGraw-Hill.
  • 1962 The heterosexual affectional system in monkeys. American Scientist, 17, 1-9.
  • 1974 A reversal of social deficits produced by isolation rearing in monkeys. Journal of Human Evolution, 3, 527-34 (with S. J. Suomi and M. A. Novak).